Inverness Vacations - Inverness Sightseeing Options-
Scotland Day Tours - Our minimum purchase is $200. Add these Inverness tours to your Scotland vacations. Sightseeing tours from Inverness.

Day tours from Inverness throughout Scotland

We have a Scotland sightseeing tour every day of the week. The itineraries are flexible enough to fit into any vacation plan, and perfect if you are traveling on your own, and want to be part of a small group.

How many people will be on the tour? Normally we restrict the number of people travelling on any multi-day tour to 16 persons. Scottish Bagpipers

Our Coaches: your comfort is paramount as you travel in our eco-friendly, low emission, modern Mercedes mini-coaches, with big panoramic windows (3 out of 4 seats are window seats), stereo systems, full sized reclining seats (with seatbelts) and more leg room than your average coach.

Tours from Inverness
1 Day Tours
Skye & Eilean Donan Castle
Cairngorm National Park and Speyside Whisky Tour
Torridon, Applecross and Eilean Donan Castle
Loch Ness and Glen Affric
Speyside Whisky and the Moray Firth Coast
The Complete Loch Ness Experience
3 Day Orkney Explorer
4 day Orkney & The Highlands

2017
June 1-Sep 30 Apr 12-19,May, Oct, Dec 18-Jan 3 Apr, Nov-Mar
1 Day Tours Adult  Child  Adult  Child  Adult  Child  Days of Operation Season dates *
Skye & Eilean Donan Castle $89 $84 $86 $81 $83 $78 Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat, Sun All year
Cairngorm National Park and Speyside Whisky Tour $60 $56 $57 $52 $52 $48 Friday All year
Torridon, Applecross and Eilean Donan Castle $72 $67 $68 $64 $67 $62 Sunday All year
Loch Ness and Glen Affric $46 $41 $41 $37 $38 $33 Saturday  All year
Speyside Whisky and the Moray Firth Coast  $57 $52 $54 $49 $51 $46 Thursday  All year
The Complete Loch Ness Experience $46 $41 $40 $35 $37 $32 Tuesday and Thursday  All year

Call 1-800-221-2474   9AM - 6PM or Please Email Us For Information
What's included in our day tours from Inverness:
INCLUDES:
  • Services of a professional Scottish tourist driver/guide
  • Transportation by air-conditioned motorcoach, limited to 16 persons

Frequent stops will be made at places of interest that you can visit, should you wish. Admission fees are not included.

Scottish Highlands tourChild rate applies ages 5-16. No children under 5, please.


Loch Ness, Glencoe & the Highlands Day Tour
1 day tour from EdinburghTravel north towards the Highlands along the “bonnie, bonnie” banks of Loch Lomond. This is Scotland's largest loch and it takes its name from the mountain Ben Lomond on the eastern shore. Crossing the ancient natural fault line that runs across Scotland you travel into the majestic Highlands where the scenery changes quickly and dramatically - the flat fertile plains of the Lowlands give way to shimmering lochs, rugged mountain tops and forest-filled glens. It's easy to forget that this was once thought of as a dangerous frontier fought over by the fiercely territorial Highland clans such as the MacGregors, made famous by the Highland folk hero, Rob Roy MacGregor. Travelling north through Breadalbane (meaning the 'High Country of Scotland'), you climb towards the wild desolation of Rannoch Moor. At an altitude of over 1000ft, covered by heather and peat-bogs and dotted with dozens of lochs, it's a unique landscape. This contrasts with the spectacular mountain scenery as you pass the majestic peak of Buachaille Etive Mor (meaning 'the great shepherd of Etive') and down into Scotland's most famous valley, Glencoe. Stunningly beautiful, with its dramatic cliff faces and steep slopes, Glencoe is infamous as the site of the Glencoe massacre in 1692. Following orders from King William, Scottish soldiers, under the leadership of Captain Robert Campbell, slaughtered 38 men, women and children of the Macdonald clan. This was especially shocking as the soldiers had been living with the people of Glencoe for 2 weeks and killed them in their own homes. Noone was ever punished for this crime, as the King himself had signed the order, but because it was murder under trust, the Highlands would never be the same again. Beyond Glencoe you will enter the Great Glen, a deep glacial valley which follows a geological fault line. Passing through the town of Fort William you drive under Britain's highest mountain, Ben Nevis before arriving at Fort Augustus on the southern shore of Loch Ness. At 23 miles long and over 700ft deep it's the largest loch by volume in Scotland and contains more water than every lake in England and Wales combined! The loch is best known for the legendary sightings of the Loch Ness Monster ("Nessie") and you can take the opportunity of a boat cruise on the loch to go in search of the monster, or simply to enjoy the beautiful scenery. Fort Augustus is a pretty little town in its own right, the Caledonian Canal which links the lochs of the Great Glen dominates the town and makes a great place to relax and watch the boats sail by. You will stop here for nearly 2 hours to give you time for lunch and take in the scenery around Scotland's most famous loch. From Loch Ness you return south again, making a short stop in Spean Bridge, before heading through the mountains of the Cairngorms National Park. Your route takes us alongside Loch Laggan (the setting for the BBC series 'Monarch of the Glen'), over the Drumochter Pass (1500ft above sea level) and past 13th century Blair Castle, ancestral home of the Duke of Atholl. Your next stop is the Highland resort town of Pitlochry, built on Victorian tourism and nestled amongst the mountains of Highland Perthshire.

STIRLING CASTLE & LOCH LOMOND NATIONAL PARK DAY TOUR
Eilean Donan CastleTravel northwest through the historic area of Linlithgowshire, close to the historic palace. The tragic Mary Queen of Scots was born at Linlithgow palace, and became Queen when she was only 6 days old. According to legend her father James V died of a broken heart when he discovered his wife had given birth to a daughter and not the son he was hoping for! Your route along the Forth Valley is one which has been used for thousands of years by invading armies, it was the northernmost frontier of the Roman empire and was later used by the English King Edward I as he marched proudly towards Stirling (only to be sent homewards to think again!). Nowadays it’s at the centre of one of Scotland’s most important industries with huge oil refineries dominating the area. As you approach Stirling the magnificent castle dominates your view and you make your way up towards the high volcanic rock where it imposes itself upon the surrounding land. Known as the ‘Key to Scotland’, for centuries this was the most important castle in Scotland and the views from the top make it easy to see why. To the north is the 220ft high tower of the National Wallace Monument commemorating Scotland’s great hero William Wallace, played by Mel Gibson in the Oscar-winning movie Braveheart. From the castle you can look down over the scene of Wallace’s greatest triumph, the battle of Stirling Bridge, where he defeated the English army in 1297. To the south is Bannockburn where, in 1314, the great Scottish warrior-king Robert the Bruce defeated the English army of Edward II. The battle was fought for possession of Stirling Castle but eventually led to a far greater prize for Scotland – the restoration of independence. It’s an area alive with history and you stop at the castle to give you time to soak up the history and heritage of this great site. From Stirling you head into the Highlands and an area known as the Trossachs. Known as ‘The Highlands in Miniature’, it marks the point where the Lowlands meet the Highlands and entering this beautifully picturesque area feels like going into a different country. With its shimmering lochs, rugged mountain tops and forest-filled glens it’s easy to forget that this was once thought of as a dangerous frontier fought over by the fiercely territorial Highland clans. You stop here for lunch in the village of Aberfoyle, made popular in Victorian times due to its great location. After lunch you ‘take the high road’ or back-road to Loch Lomond, Scotland’s largest lochs at over 22 miles long, passing Lochs Ard, Chon and Arklet along the way as you travel through the protected lands of Scotland’s first National Park. The route you take was described by the famous Scots comedian Billy Connolly as his favourite road in Scotland, and you can discover why – it’s stunning!! You stop at Inversnaid on the secluded north-east of the loch, making it the perfect place to enjoy a walk along the ‘bonny banks’, up to a viewpoint for a fantastic view of the loch and the mountain it’s named after, Ben Lomond. This tranquil setting was once the home of Scotland’s famous highland folk hero, Rob Roy MacGregor. Made popular by many books and films Rob Roy lived an incredible life as a soldier, businessman, cattle-rustler and outlaw. By spending time on the trails by the loch you will undoubtedly be walking in the footsteps of one of Scotland’s great legends. There is also an alternative option to take a boat cruise around the north of the loch (Summer only) or merely enjoy a drink at the local hotel and sample the views. Leaving Loch Lomond you return to Edinburgh passing Scotland’s only lake – the Lake of Mentieth (although we have around 3000 freshwater lochs!). The legend states that after William Wallace was betrayed by his great friend the Earl of Mentieth and executed in London the name was changed from the Loch of Mentieth to the Lake of Mentieth so that nobody would ever forget the traitorous part the Earl played in his death.

WEST HIGHLAND LOCHS & CASTLES DAY TOUR
Eilean Donan CastleTravel past Stirling castle to your first stop at Doune Castle. This area of Scotland has certainly seen its fair share of fighting and warfare. Stirling castle was once known as the 'Key to Scotland', and it was here that William Wallace (immortalised by Mel Gibson in the film Braveheart) defeated the English army in 1297. After William Wallace's death it was Robert the Bruce who continued the fight for independence and you will pass the site of his most famous victory in 1314 at the Battle of Bannockburn. Then you arrive at the fantastic medieval stronghold of Doune castle. Built for Robert Stewart, the Duke of Albany, over 600 years ago the castle is still in great condition and you will have time for photos. You might even have seen the castle before, it was made famous by the film 'Monty Python and The Holy Grail', with many scenes filmed here. You then continue a little further on to Callander. After a short coffee stop you cross the Highland boundary fault line leaving the rolling farms for the wild mountains and forests of the Highlands. You will make a short stop at Loch Luibnaig before you continue over the Braes of Balquhidder, the final resting place of Highland outlaw Rob Roy MacGregor. Made famous by Sir Walter Scott, Rob Roy was a sort of Highland Robin Hood, he stole from the rich, but never quite got round to giving it to the poor. From Balquhidder the tour winds its way through the tough knot of mountains known as Breadalbane (meaning the 'high country of Scotland') before we stop for lunch in a small West Highland village. Shortly after lunch you will see Kilchurn Castle, a magnificent ruin situated in the middle of Loch Awe and former home of the Campbells of Breadalbane. You will continue along the banks of Loch Awe through Campbell country to the picturesque town of Inveraray on the shores of Loch Fyne. Here you can visit the 18th-century castle and home of the Duke of Argyll, chief of the Campbell clan. The town was built at the same time as the castle and has the air of a classic 18th-century planned village with its straight wide streets and dignified Georgian houses. You can take time to explore the town and maybe call at the Old Jail or the maritime museum, the Arctic Penguin. Leaving Inveraray, you take a drive up through the steep-sided mountains known as the Arrochar Alps to the great viewpoint at 'Rest and Be Thankful'. It was given its name in 1753 by the weary soldiers who had just finished building the old military road up through Glen Croe. From here you skirt around Loch Long and down to the Bonnie, Bonnie banks of Loch Lomond. This is Scotland's largest loch and it takes its name from the mountain Ben Lomond on the eastern shore. You make a short stop at the conservation village of Luss, with its quaint houses and stunning views across the loch.

HIGHLAND LOCHS, GLENS & WHISKY DAY TOUR
HighlandsTravel north over the Forth Road Bridge, passing one of Scotland's great engineering wonders - the Forth Rail Bridge. Continuing north into the Kingdom of Fife you pass Loch Leven castle where Mary Queen of Scots was imprisoned in 1567 and forced to abdicate from the throne. Further on you will also pass Perth, the medieval capital of Scotland, before crossing the Highland Boundary Fault line, and the point where the scenery changes from the rolling farmland of the Lowlands to the forested hills and mountains of the Scottish Highlands. Surrounded by this beautiful scenery and on the banks of the River Tay is the Cathedral town of Dunkeld, your first stop of the day. Dunkeld was for many centuries the capital of the Christian Celtic Church, and its 13th century Cathedral reflects the once great importance of this quaint Highland village. From Dunkeld it's a short drive to the Hermitage, a fantastic woodland walk leading up to the Black Linn Falls where the River Braan cascades into a narrow gorge. Surrounded by some of Scotland's tallest trees and changing spectacularly in appearance throughout the seasons it's a great place at any time of year. You may even have the chance to see the spectacular sight of Salmon attempting to leap up the falls and on towards their spawning grounds. Leaving the Hermitage you follow the wide valley of the River Tay towards the Victorian resort town of Pitlochry. You will spend around 1 hour here and you can visit the many great shops and restaurants or maybe even take a walk down towards Loch Faskally. After lunch you take a scenic drive through the mountains of Highland Perthshire, first crossing over the Pass of Killiecrankie before a short stop at the Queen's View overlooking Loch Tummel. On a clear day the view here is stunning, looking over to the unmistakable peak of Schiehallion and beyond to the mountains of Glencoe. Continuing alongside Loch Tummel you then head over the hills and past the spectacular sixteenth century Castle Menzies towards the town of Aberfeldy and Dewars Whisky distillery*, where you can discover the secret of how Scotland's national drink is made. No visit to Scotland is complete without sampling a 'wee dram' and you will get the chance to taste some of the finished product. Known in the Gaelic as Uisge Beatha (or 'water of life') whisky has been produced for centuries in Scotland and the art is now close to perfection. Later you travel West into the ancient lands of Breadalbane, or the ‘High Country’ surrounding Loch Tay and make your way along the loch towards Killin. The small town is situated on the edge of the River Dochart and has the fantastic Falls of Dochart at its heart, flowing under the old bridge and past the ancient burial ground of the Clan MacNab who once dominated the area. After Killin you take a drive over the Braes of Balquhidder, the resting place of Highland outlaw Rob Roy MacGregor before passing Stirling Castle and Linlithgow Palace.
Call 1-800-221-2474   9AM - 6PM or Please Email Us For Information


Scottish highlands and IslandsST ANDREWS & THE FISHING VILLAGES OF FIFE DAY TOUR
Travel north to South Queensferry. The town is named after the 11th century Queen Margaret who dedicated her life to changing the social welfare of the people, particularly the church, earning her the title 'Saint Margaret of Scotland'. North of Edinburgh there were two very important churches - St Andrews and Dunfermline, but getting from Edinburgh across the wide Firth of Forth was difficult, so Queen Margaret provided a free ferry for pilgrims, hence 'Queen's Ferry'. The ferry remained in existence until the opening of the Forth Road Bridge in 1964 by the present Queen. From Queensferry we drive up and onto the Forth Road Bridge, giving us a great view across to one of Scotland's greatest man-made landmarks - the Forth Rail Bridge. At over a mile and a half (2300m) long, the bridge was completed in 1890, and until recently was the longest Cantilever bridge in the world. It is a true testament of Scottish engineering. Once over the bridge we enter the Kingdom of Fife. Bounded to the south by the wide Firth of Forth, to the north by the Firth of Tay and to the east by the North Sea the area was once a sub-kingdom of the old Pictish realm, a natural peninsula almost cut off from the rest of Scotland, and so remained semi-independent for longer than other parts. Central Fife used to be very poor, until the discovery of coal, while the towns and villages along its coastline were rich from all the trade across the North sea, causing King James VI to describe the area as a 'Beggar's mantle fringed with gold'. The golden fringe he referred to was the East Neuk (or nook, meaning corner), Fife's easternmost stretch of coastline and home to a string of picturesque villages each with its own distinctive character and charm. One of these, Lower Largo, is best known as the birthplace of Alexander Selkirk the real-life Robinson Crusoe and inspiration for Daniel Defoe's novel whilst neighbouring Earlsferry is said to be where MacDuff hid from Shakespeare's Macbeth. We stop in the traditional fishing village of Anstruther (known as 'Enster' locally) where you can check out its old cobbled streets and network of little alleyways and wynds or take a walk along the seafront to the harbour. From Anstruther we continue north to the medieval town of St Andrews. St Andrew is the patron Saint of Scotland, and according to legend his remains were washed up on the Fife coast. The shrine became a place of worship for Christian pilgrims from far and wide and the town developed into the religious capital of Scotland complete with a huge Norman Cathedral, the largest in all of Scotland. Founded in 1160 the Cathedral was devastated first by fire and later by zealous religious reformers but the ruins provide a fascinating insight into what it once must have been like. Today St Andrews attracts another type of pilgrim, being famous world-wide as the home of golf and the Mecca for all golfers - the 'Old Course'. The course, founded in 1754, is in beautiful condition and its emerald green grass contrasts with the golden sands of the beach nearby. St Andrews is also home to the oldest University in Scotland, at nearly 600 years old, and the third oldest in Britain behind Oxford and Cambridge. Also dating from this period is the town's once mighty castle which, perched on a rocky headland overhanging the sea, is a ruin with a violent and murderous past. Every street, every building is surrounded with history and we give you almost 3 hours to explore this amazing town. From St Andrews we take a pleasant drive through the rolling countryside of central Fife, with its small villages and patchwork of farms, to Falkland. Falkland Palace dominates this old village, and was one of the main residences of the old Royal family of Scotland, the Stewarts (Stuarts). Aside from the palace the village is simply one of the most beautiful in Scotland with an array of old cottages and narrow winding streets. You can take time to wander around the picturesque village or enjoy a drink in one of the villages traditional pubs or tearooms. Leaving Falkland we return to Edinburgh, passing Loch Leven, where Mary Queen of Scots was imprisoned by her Protestant nobility.

ROSSLYN CHAPEL & THE SCOTTISH BORDERS DAY TOUR
Scotland HighlandsYour tour takes you south to the world famous Scott’s View, with stunning views over the Tweed Valley and the Eildon Hills. You will also get the opportunity to visit the original Wallace Monument. From here you travel to Melrose with the opportunity to explore its great Border Abbey, founded by the Cistercians in the 12th Century. The Cistercian monks had very close connections with the Knights Templar and Melrose Abbey is the burial place of Robert the Bruce's heart, brought back from the crusades in Moorish Spain. Following lunch in Melrose you will make your way to the stunning 15th century Rosslyn Chapel, immortalised in Dan Brown’s “Da Vinci Code” and you can find out more about the myths and legends surrounding the whereabouts of the “Holy Grail”.

Alnwick Castle, Berwick and the Borders
Monday, Tuesday, Saturday
Departs 09.30 Returns 18.30
Alnwick Castle tourA day spent in the Borderlands of Scotland and England. Our tour follows the ancient Roman Dere Street that connected Scottish Caledonia with Roman Britannia through the Scottish Borders. Stopping at Melrose, home to the remains of the Cistercian Abbey and the burial place of the heart of Scottish King Robert the Bruce who lived and fought in the area that we are travelling through today. Continuing South we cross the border and travel onto imposing Alnwick Castle, one of the great castles of Northumberland that has stood for nearly a millenium. Originally built to protect the north of England from Scottish border reivers and invaders, more recently Alnwick Castle and its perfectly manicured gardens have found fame as one of the settings for the fictional Hogwarts school in the Harry Potter movie series. After almost 3 hours to explore Alnwick Castle we head towards the ancient gateway town of Berwick Upon Tweed, a strategic walled town at the estuary of the River Tweed, that has swung between Scottish and English control over many centuries. There is time to explore the city walls or visit the Georgian army barracks before returning to Edinburgh along the rugged coast of Berwickshire and East Lothian.

Hadrian's Wall, Roman Britain and The Scottish Borders

Highlights:
~ The Scottish Borders
~ Carter Bar  - the Scotland/England Border
~ Hadrian’s Wall
~ Steel Rigg, Northumberland (Walk)
~ visit Vindolanda or Birdoswold.
~ Moffat  - a 19th Century Spa Town

A day spent discovering the highlights of Roman Britain and Hadrian’s Wall. Let us guide you through the heart of the Scottish Borders and 2000 years of history to the wild last frontier of the mighty Roman Empire.

This tour is ideal for those who would like to experience the wild remoteness of this ancient Roman outpost and the rolling hills and borderlands of Southern Scotland.

Discover Malt Whisky 1 Day Tour


~ Glengoyne Distillery
~ Loch Lomond National Park
~ Lunch in a lochside pub serving local ales
~ Deanston Distillery
~ Additional whisky tasting options
Come an experience Scotland’s “Water of Life”  - single malt Scotch whisky  - with visits to two  fascinating distilleries situated right on the edge of the Highlands. In between these visits enjoy the beautiful scenery of the Loch Lomond National Park.
This tour is for lovers of Scotch single malt whisky and for those who would like to know more about our national drink.

Departs: 09.30       Returns: 18.15 approx 
Departing: Tues, Thurs, Sat (All Year) Questions? Contact Lynott Tours, your Scotland travel agents at 1 (800) 221-2474USA & Canada 

Please Email Us For Information

Cancellation Penalties: Land: Penalties per person apply: 70 days or longer: Forfeiture of deposit 69 - 46 days: 35% per person 45 - 22 : 45% per person 21-1 days 100% per person Travel Insurance from $60